July 5, 2022

WHOA! The meteorite fell through the house in Canada and lost the woman inside a little bit

Watch the video above to see more about this story. A woman in British Columbia in Canada thanked her lucky stars. Earlier this month, a meteorite heading towards Earth collided with Ruth Hamilton’s home. A few minutes before the impact, she woke up to find her dog barking. The next thing she knew, was a serious accident. “Suddenly there was an explosion,” Hamilton told CTV News Vancouver. Hamilton then jumped out of bed, turned on the lights, and went to investigate the riot. Just then, above where she was sleeping, she noticed a fist-sized hole in the ceiling. After calling 911, she looked around the bed and flipped her pillow. Then she looked up; Smooth, angular piece of black rock. “I didn’t realize it,” Hamilton said. “It didn’t touch me. There were debris on my face from the drywall, but not even a scratch.” Police arrived at the scene to investigate Hamilton and nearby construction crews. In the sky, “before the impact, a team of University of Calgary and Western University researchers explored Hamilton’s home to learn more about the space rock. Found a second rock that weighed in. “We’re trying to reconstruct the path that came through the sky,” said Phil McClend, a geologist at Western University. Gives us an idea of ​​where it came from. ” The rocks rarely land. “The primary misconception is that they are hot when they land,” they began to cool about 10 to 15 miles in the atmosphere. “Ms. Hamilton’s bed did not catch fire.” 1 in 4 trillion when asked if she plans to buy a lottery ticket, she smiles and then responds: “I won the lottery, I won it, I’m alive. I look at it and laugh. I feel beautiful and blessed. “CTV News Vancouver contributed to this report.

Watch the video above to learn more about this story.

A woman in British Columbia, Canada is thanking her lucky stars.

Earlier this month, a meteorite heading towards Earth collided with Ruth Hamilton’s home.

A few minutes before the impact, she woke up to find her dog barking. The next thing she knew, was a serious accident.

“Suddenly there was an explosion,” Hamilton told CTV News Vancouver. Hamilton then jumped out of bed, turned on the lights, and went to examine the excitement.

Just then she noticed a fist-sized hole in her roof, just above where she was fast asleep.

After calling 911, she looked around the bed and flipped the pillow. Then she looked up; Smooth, angular piece of black rock.

“I didn’t realize it,” Hamilton said. “It didn’t touch me. There were debris on my face from the drywall, but not even a scratch.”

Police arrived at the scene and questioned Hamilton and nearby construction crews, who later told authorities they had seen a “bright ball in the sky” before the impact.

A team of researchers from the University of Calgary and Western University explored Hamilton’s home to learn more about the space rock.

Later in the week, they opened their investigation to other parts of the city of Golden in British Columbia, where Hamilton resides. The team eventually found a second rock weighing more than a pound in the northeast of the city.

“We are trying to rebuild the path that came through the sky,” said Phil McClend, a geologist at Western University. “If we could reconstruct what orbit was before it hit Earth it would be scientifically very valuable. It gives us an idea of ​​where it came from.”

The research team has appealed to the people of the area to come up with any other evidence about the impact of the meteorite.

Hamilton quoted the university as crediting the meteorite for its potential for photography, weighing, measuring, and modeling. She expects to get it back by November 30th.

Officials say hundreds of meteorites hit the Earth’s surface every year. However, it is rare for space rocks to land in easily recoverable areas.

“The primary misconception is that they are hot when they land,” they began to cool about 10 to 15 miles in the atmosphere. “Mrs. Hamilton’s bed did not catch fire.”

Experts say the chances of a meteor landing in your home are astronomical. In particular, 1 in 4 trillion.

When asked if she was planning to buy a lottery ticket, she smiled and then replied:

“I won the lottery. I won it, I’m alive. I laugh at it. I feel so blessed.”

CTV News Vancouver contributed to this report.