December 10, 2022

Tropical Storm Ian

Tropical Storm Ian

The WDSU weather team is keeping a close eye on several areas in the tropics, but the main area of ​​interest is Tropical Storm Ian, as models have slowly moved westward in the past couple of days, but the last few updates have kept the forecast cone steady. This is good for us. We’re still keeping a close eye on this storm, which is a good idea for you to check back in, too. So far, though, the expectation is for Ian to stay east of us, and being in the far west of the storm means we’ll end up with nice weather! Let’s get into the details of where Ian might be headed. Tropical Storm Ian is expected to start strong later today. Currently, Ian is located 300 miles southeast of Grand Cayman and 570 miles southeast of the western tip of Cuba. It has winds of 50 mph and is moving west at 14 mph. Ian will likely turn into a Category 1 hurricane last night, and then likely become a Category 2 hurricane by tomorrow afternoon as it passes near Grand Cayman. A typhoon warning has been issued for the island, and from there it will continue to strengthen and could be a major Category 3 hurricane by Monday night. It will then likely make landfall in far western Cuba, and after crossing Cuba, it will quickly strengthen into a Category 4 hurricane in the Gulf. As of the 10 a.m. update, maximum winds are expected to reach 130 mph. Fortunately, it is expected to weaken after that as it targets the Gulf Coast due to increased wind shear. However, despite the weakening, Ian will slow down and his wind field is likely to widen, so the effects of large winds and storms are still possible. Looks like Ian is still targeting Florida. The official forecast cone from the National Hurricane Center includes areas near Gulf Shores, AL, to Fort Myers, FL. Remember that the center of a hurricane is expected to make landfall anywhere within the cone, so the entire coast within the cone must be preparing for a possible landing in their area. If he makes the landfall closer to Tampa, it will be stronger on landfall, and that landing will likely happen on Wednesday night. It makes landfall in the Panhandle, it will be a weaker hurricane and landing could be closer to Friday morning. There have been slow trends to the west over the past couple of days, but as mentioned earlier, these shifts have stalled this morning. At this point, it’s still a good idea to keep checking the latest data and discussion here at wdsu.com and in our regular news releases throughout the day. However, the east is still far enough away that we should not expect effects beyond the breeze. There’s only a 5% chance of sustained tropical storm strength winds here, and along with that system, we’re seeing two named storms and an area where it could develop, Hermine is now a post-tropical cyclone. It will continue to throw torrential rains on parts of the Canary Islands. Tropical Storm Gaston has been underestimated in relation to vulnerability. The Gaston Center has re-developed in the far west, tropical storm warnings have ceased in the Azores, and the chance of a tropical wave developing west of the islands of Cabo Verde in the tropical mid-Atlantic remains weak over the next five days. Stay with WDSU for the latest.

The WDSU weather team is keeping a close eye on many areas in the tropics, but the main area of ​​interest to us is Tropical Storm Ian.

The models have slowly moved west in the past couple of days, but the last few updates have kept the cone of expectations steady. This is good for us. We’re still keeping a close eye on this storm, which is a good idea for you to check back in, too.

So far, though, the expectation is for Ian to stay east of us, and being in the far west of the storm means we’ll end up with nice weather! Let’s get into the details of where Ian might be headed.

Tropical Storm Ian is expected to start strong later today. Currently, Ian is located 300 miles southeast of Grand Cayman and 570 miles southeast of the western tip of Cuba. It has winds of 50 mph and is moving west at 14 mph.

Ian will likely turn into a Category 1 hurricane overnight tonight.

Ian will then likely become a Category 2 hurricane by tomorrow afternoon as it passes near Grand Cayman. A hurricane warning has been issued on the island.

From there, it will continue to strengthen and could be a major Category 3 hurricane by Monday night. It is then likely to make landfall in the far west of Cuba.

Far from its crossing with Cuba, it would quickly intensify into a Category 4 hurricane in the Gulf. As of the 10 a.m. update, maximum winds are expected to reach 130 mph.

Fortunately, it is expected to weaken after that as it targets the Gulf Coast due to increased wind shear. However, despite the weakening, Ian will slow down and his wind field is likely to widen, so the effects of large winds and storms are still possible.

Ian

Looks like Ian is still targeting Florida. The official forecast cone from the National Hurricane Center includes areas near Gulf Shores, AL, to Fort Myers, FL.

Remember that the center of a hurricane is expected to make landfall anywhere within the cone, so the entire coast within the cone must prepare for a possible landing in its area.

If he makes the landfall closer to Tampa, it will be stronger on landfall, and that landing will likely happen on Wednesday night. It makes landfall in the Panhandle, it will be a weaker hurricane and landing could be closer to Friday morning.

Ian

There have been slow trends to the west over the past couple of days, but as mentioned earlier, these shifts have stalled this morning. At this point, it’s still a good idea to keep checking the latest data and discussion here at wdsu.com and in our regular news releases throughout the day. However, the east is still far enough away that we should not expect effects beyond the breeze. There is only a 5% probability of sustained tropical storm strength winds here.

Ian

Hearst owned

Tropical storm force winds and hurricane force winds are not expected in our area.

Alongside this system, we see two named storms and an area that could be developed.

Ian

Hermine is now a post-tropical cyclone. And it will continue to throw heavy rains on parts of the Canary Islands.

Tropical Storm Gaston has been underestimated in relation to vulnerability. Gaston Center redeveloped far to the west, and tropical storm warnings for the Azores have ceased.

The chance of a tropical wave developing west of the islands of Cabo Verde in the tropical mid-Atlantic remains low over the next five days.

Stay with WDSU for the latest.