January 27, 2023

Joe Mercia Marley, grandson of reggae legend Bob Marley, dies at 31: Reports

Joseph “Joe Mersa” Marley, son of musician Stephen Marley and grandson of reggae legend Bob Marley, has died. He was 31 years old.

Jamaican-American reggae artist found unresponsive in car According to an initial tweet by journalist Abka Fitz-Henley Tuesday.

South Florida radio station WZPP posted on Instagram that they have confirmed the death of Jo Mersa and Matt said An asthma attack, although it is not specified where it occurred. She noted that the singer left behind a wife and daughter.

The Post has contacted Jo Mersa’s reps for comment.

His grandfather was a pioneer of the reggae movement and was known for songs like “Everything’s Gonna Be Alright”, “Get Up, Get Up”, “Is This Love”, “I Shot the Sheriff” and more.

Bob Marley He died in 1981 from skin cancer at the age of only 36. He had 11 children with seven different women.

Jo Mirissa Marley visits Fox 29’s Good Day at FOX 29 Studio on April 9, 2015 in Philadelphia.
GC photos
Jo Mirissa Marley performs on stage during the Caribbean Village Festival at Miramar Regional Amphitheater on June 23, 2019, in Miramar, Florida.
Jo Mirissa Marley performs on stage during the Caribbean Village Festival at Miramar Regional Amphitheater on June 23, 2019, in Miramar, Florida.
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Stephen Marley also has a daughter, Mystic Marley, He is also a musician. Stephen’s siblings include musician Ziggy Marley and businessman Rohan Marley.

Joe Mirsa spent his early years in Jamaica before moving to Florida for high school. He studied studio engineering at Miami-Dade College, according to a 2014 Jamaica Observer story.

released an EP,”comfortable,” in 2014 Title track included.

In an interview in 2021 with Jamaica Gleaner, Timed to his second EP “Eternal”—which featured Melii, Black-Am-I, Busy Signal, and Kabaka Pyramid—Joe Mersa opened up about his songwriting prowess.

“In all honesty, it depends on the atmosphere because sometimes you’ll have a melody or an idea, like a whole melody in your head but no beat, and other times, you’ll have a beat and no beat,” he said. “It’s for me, of course. I can’t speak for everyone. I can finish some songs in a night, and some take longer.”

In a 2014 Jamaica Observer story, he notes that following in his father’s footsteps has been challenging.

“My father created a legacy by putting out songs with meaning,” he said. “It’s something I have to live up to.”

he is I also opened on his grandfather’s legacy in 2021, saying his family often looks back on him year after year on the anniversary of his death.

“We always hear those thoughts, we talk about those things, about the role he played not only as a family member, but also in the world and the impact he had on the reggae community and reggae culture, the roots, the going forward with the message of Rastafari and love, above all love,” said Regevil.