December 6, 2022

Eversource CEO wrote a letter to Biden about winter challenges

Eversource CEO wrote a letter to Biden about winter challenges

Eversource CEO said Monday he wrote a letter to President Joe Biden because he has serious concerns about New England’s ability to withstand a harsh winter, and Eversource CEO Joe Nolan said supply problems mean New England may not have enough Natural gas for heating the area. Houses in cold winter condition. He said that global fuel prices had risen due to the war in Ukraine and Russia’s decision to cut off gas from Europe. That, he said, caused a global scramble for natural gas, particularly liquefied natural gas carried on tankers, on which New England depends during the coldest months of the year. Nolan wrote a letter to Biden last week, saying he was deeply concerned about the potentially severe impact of the winter energy shortage on people and businesses in New England. “It’s a very important time, a very difficult time for New Englanders, and I want everyone to know that I worry every day about 4.2 million customers and I’m sure we’ll have what it takes to provide them with great service, and that was really why I’m sending the message to the President” Nolan said. Nolan stated that the federal government has emergency authority, such as using the Federal Energy Act, the Jones Act, the Natural Gas Policy Act, and the Defense Production Act. “The president did this when Puerto Rico was devastated. He was able to provide relief through the Jones Act that allowed foreign ships the ability to enter and exit US ports with needed supplies,” Nolan said. “It’s no different,” Nolan said. Eversource has boosted its investment in clean energy resources. “But right now, we’re in a very fragile state,” Nolan said. “We’ve been through two years of moving and we have to make sure we can bridge that gap and reach the promised land that’s clean, reliable and renewable energy.” News 9 has reached the White House for comment but no response has yet been received. New Hampshire consumer attorney Don Kress agreed that if there was an extended cold snap, there was a chance there wouldn’t be enough natural gas to power all of the area’s factories. “This is not a cause for panic or a great concern, there are things we can do to make sure the lights stay on.” Chris suggests pooling to be as energy efficient as possible and to be aware of how much energy is being used early in the evening when demand is high.

The CEO of Eversource said Monday that he wrote a letter to President Joe Biden because he has serious concerns about New England’s ability to withstand a harsh winter.

Eversource CEO Joe Nolan said supply problems mean New England may not have enough natural gas to heat area homes in the event of a cold winter.

He said that global fuel prices had risen due to the war in Ukraine and Russia’s decision to cut off gas from Europe. That, he said, caused a global scramble for natural gas, particularly liquefied natural gas carried on tankers, on which New England depends during the coldest months of the year.

Nolan wrote a letter to Biden last week, saying he was deeply concerned about the potentially severe impact of the winter energy shortage on people and businesses in New England.

“It’s a very important time, a very difficult time for New Englanders, and I want everyone to know that I worry every day about 4.2 million customers and I’m sure we’ll have what it takes to provide them with great service, and that was really why I’m sending the message to the President. “.

Nolan stated that the federal government has emergency authority, such as using the Federal Energy Act, the Jones Act, the Natural Gas Policy Act, and the Defense Production Act.

“The president did this when Puerto Rico was devastated,” Nolan said. “He was able to provide relief through the Jones Act, which allowed foreign ships the ability to enter and exit US ports with needed supplies.” “This is no different.”

Nolan said Eversource has boosted its investments in clean energy resources.

“But right now we are in a very fragile state,” Nolan said. “We’ve been through two years of moving and we have to make sure we can bridge that gap and reach the promised land that’s clean, reliable and renewable energy.”

News 9 has reached the White House for comment, but has yet to hear back.

Don Criss, a consumer attorney in New Hampshire, agreed that if there was a prolonged cold snap, there likely wouldn’t be enough natural gas to power all of the area’s stations.

“This is not a cause for panic or extreme concern, there are things we can do to make sure the lights stay on,” Chris said.

Chris suggests pooling to be as energy efficient as possible and to be aware of how much energy is being used early in the evening when demand is high.