July 2, 2022

Airlines canceled more flights after 8,000 flights were canceled over the Christmas weekend

Flights related to Govt were canceled on Monday.

Airlines around the world have canceled less than 8,000 flights over the three-day Christmas weekend due to the spread of the Omigron variant and staff shortages due to bad weather.

According to Flightaware.com, which monitors flight departures, delays and cancellations, another 1,639 flights were canceled on Monday, affecting only a third of the United States. A significant number of cancellations also affected China.

The cancellation caused a major setback in returning to the Christmas journey this year, and caused further anxiety and uncertainty after the 2020 holiday season was hit hard by the epidemic.

Passengers at Minneapolis-St Paul’s Airport in the state of Minnesota expressed their disappointment.

“I booked this trip in February and we still don’t know if we’re going to deal with COVID, that’s crazy,” Tamera Robinson said of her canceled flight.

Air delays and cancellations related to staff shortages have been a persistent problem in the U.S. aviation industry this year.

After the collapse of air travel last year, American airlines encouraged workers to leave.

But this year air travel has largely recovered and they have left themselves as understaffed.

United Airlines said in a statement that the increase in Omigron cases had “a direct impact” on their flight crews and the people who run their operations.

“As a result, unfortunately we had to cancel some flights and inform the affected customers in advance of their arrival at the airport,” the company said.

Other airlines, such as Lufthansa, have also been plagued by staff shortages as more pilots and cabin crew are said to be infected with the virus or to be isolated once they arrive in specific countries.

Chinese airlines, especially China Eastern and Air China, canceled more than 2,000 flights over the three-day weekend alone, many of which flew to Xi’an, where 13 million people are currently locked up.