January 30, 2023

A radio signal has been captured from 9 billion light-years from Earth

radio signal 9 billion light years away Far from Earth, it was captured in record recording, Space.com said Friday.

The signal was detected by a unique wavelength known as the “21cm line” or “hydrogen line”, which is said to be emitted by neutral hydrogen atoms.

the The signal has been captured With the Giant Metrewave radio telescope in India that could mean scientists can begin to investigate the formation of some of the most ancient stars and galaxies, according to the report.

Scientists involved in the GMRT upgrade project.
(Hemant Mishra/Mint via Getty Images)

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The researchers detected the signal from a “star-forming galaxy” named SDSSJ0826+5630, which was emitted when the 13.8-billion-year-old Milky Way – the galaxy in which Earth resides – was only 4.9 billion years old.

“It’s the equivalent of looking back at a time 8.8 billion years ago,” Arnab Chakraborty, an author and postdoctoral cosmologist at McGill University, said in a statement this week.

A view of the Milky Way from the Puyehue National Park area near the city of Osorno, Chile, May 8, 2008.

A view of the Milky Way from the Puyehue National Park area near the city of Osorno, Chile, May 8, 2008.
(Reuters/Ivan Alvarado)

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Galaxies are said to emit light across a wide range of radio wavelengths. But until recently, radio waves with a wavelength of 21 cm were only recorded from nearby galaxies.

“A galaxy emits different types of radio signals. Until now, it was only possible to pick up this particular signal from a nearby galaxy, which limits our knowledge of those galaxies closest to Earth,” Chakraborty said.

A model arranges a scale model of a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) antenna on display during the 'Vigyan Samagam', the multi-venue mega-science exhibition, at the Visveswaraya Industrial and Technology Museum in Bangalore on July 29, 2019.

A model arranges a scale model of a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) antenna on display during the ‘Vigyan Samagam’, the multi-venue mega-science exhibition, at the Visveswaraya Industrial and Technology Museum in Bangalore on July 29, 2019.
(Manjunat Kiran/AFP via Getty Images)

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the The signal allowed astronomers to measure the galactic gaseous content and thus find the galactic mass.

The report said that this design led scientists to conclude that this distant galaxy is twice the mass of stars visible from Earth.